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Published on January 18th, 2011 | by Heather

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Lights, Camera, Action from LumoPro

‘Strobists’ as they are called, are photographers who use small, battery powered flashes to obtain eclectic and ingenious pictures. Strobists have found a home on a blog by the “Midwest Photo Exchange”:http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/02/welcome-to-strobist.html. This fascinating blog from strobe-guru David Hobby provides resources for beginners to professional photographers in need of advice or guidance on lighting and advancement with small-flash lighting gear and techniques. With that said, LumoPro, a relatively new company in existence since 2004, handles studio and lighting equipment and in the past had success with their LP120 Shoe Mount Flash. It was developed with the aforementioned website in mind, gathering feedback from the core group of users, using the crowd to help determine the product roadmap. After enjoying some success from the LP120, LumoPro recently unveiled the “LP160 Quad-sync Flash”:http://www.lumopro.com/product.php?id=25 which sits pretty at an attractive price point with sufficient features.

At first glance, the quality is subpar, but is a bit more fair once the pricetag is taken into account. The unit is plastic with a metal shoe, and between some small issues with putting it on a stand and a fairly cheap battery door, we were a little concerned. As regular photographers, we’ve tried a variety of flashes, normally sticking with the manufacturer’s units (Speedlight and Speedlite, depending on whether you use Nikon or Canon).

However, the the super-sensitive optical slave cemented this gadget as a low-budget lighting tool that performs substantially and steadily almost every single time. Since the new digital optical slave will ignore the “pre-flash”, TTL fans will rejoice.

The LP160 is a follow-up to the LP120 and couldn’t have come at a better time. As an avid Canon user, this particular model was supposed to rival the Canon 580EXII or the Nikon SB-900, at least in terms of power. We do not wholeheartedly agree with that statement but can attest the LP160 is proficient, and works well for those who aren’t locked into one of the others or perhaps want a backup. It is now possible to go to a lower power, 1/64, and a zoom from 24mm to 105mm all by the touch of a button. As with others, it’s easy enough to swivel the flash almost all the way around as well at a ninety-degree tilt. Electronic zoom ability is a nice addition. The box also includes additional accessories including a wide-angle diffuser, mini- to PC- synch cable, and a flash stand. The included stand could use some effort as it was the same feeble plastic and didn’t include a thread. There is also a respectable two-year warranty though!

Overall, this sharp shooter is worth its moderate price. With an impressive list of features, it is the ideal tool to practice strobe techniques on. We found it for about $160 on the “Midwest Photo Exchange”:http://www.mpex.com/browse.cfm/4,14648.html. And for those who would like some accessories for their flash, you can check out our coverage on a variety of filters, “not to mention yesterday’s review of and excellent camera bag”:http://www.trulynet.com/photography/clik-elite-escape-ideal-day-long-adventures.

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About the Author

Heather Millward is a contributor to the website as well as a stay-at-home wife (not by choice). She has lived in Iowa, San Francisco, and most recently, Arizona. Her goal is to travel, write a book, and quit killing Zombies as she has become quite obsessed with "Call of Duty" and might need an intervention. She enjoys food, wine, reading, and the return of Arrested Development. Heather considers herself to be a fashionista and though she didn't end up at FIDM as originally planned, she considers Trina Turk, Tory Burch, Burberry, and Chanel to be among her favorites. After she wins the powerball jackpot, she has planned a lengthy shopping trip to Neiman Marcus. Though she graduated from a University with the mascot of a Peacock and has never worked in Public Administration, she has done her fair share of sales and advertising.



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